DriveThruRPG.com
Browse Categories













Back
Other comments left for this publisher:
You must be logged in to rate this
Godbound Art Pack
by angela d. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 06/28/2019 12:33:56

Great art pack, thanks a lot for these beautiful illustrations, and thanks to the Kickstarter for allowing the distribution of these illustrations



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Godbound Art Pack
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Stars Without Number: Original Free Edition
by Bradley G. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 06/19/2019 15:59:32

I was really happy with the speed of the printing and delivery of the book and other than a small stain on one page that bled onto the next page i was really happy with the overall conditions the book arrived in.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Stars Without Number: Original Free Edition
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Stars Without Number: Revised Edition
by Daniel O. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 06/08/2019 04:33:55

This has been my go-to scifi system for over two years now. Simple to learn with plenty of extra content if you are a GM looking to spice up your campaign.

I recommend this book even if you do not have plans to ever run SWN, but plan to run science fiction games in general. The GM section is full of useful generators for NPCs, their names, planets, and entire star systems. If your players could end up on a random planet you have not planned for, there are chapters here that will save you...and damn them.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Stars Without Number: Revised Edition
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Godbound: A Game of Divine Heroes (Deluxe Edition)
by William S. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 06/07/2019 13:47:03

I love this book. Presentation is excellent. It could have come right of the shelf of a bookstore. The game itself is fantastic. The advice for running a sandbox game is outstanding. You could have very little (or no) experience as a DM/GM/referee/judge and the "Running the World" chapter would provide you a solid education on how to approach a sandbox vs. the more modern storytelling structure of DMing. The provided game setting of the Realm of Arcem is outstanding. Kevin Crawford has provided not just an outline of the various nations and kingdoms of Arcem, but in depth information of each; he's done the worldbuilding for you. If running or playing demigods sounds intriguing I can't recommend this OSR based system enough. Well done Mr. Crawford!



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Godbound: A Game of Divine Heroes (Deluxe Edition)
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Godbound: A Game of Divine Heroes (Deluxe Edition)
by Antonio D. L. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 06/04/2019 16:08:14

Quite simply, Godbound made me fall in love with everything in it. I loved and respected the free access granted by the Author to the free version of the rules, and I decided to support him after spending many afternoons reading and re-reading this manual.

It's packed full of good, sound advice. The rules are elegant, simple yet offering exactly what I've been looking for in my games: a mechanic structure to support a sandbox narrative without constricting it in too many specifications. It's fast, simple and entertaining.

It's a joy to create adventures in Godbound with all the tools and good considerations offered and well presented to an aspiring DM.

Arcem, the setting presented inside, it's quite captivating and offers ample space for personalization and further delving into philosophies and religions. I found it captivating and focused on giving intersting ideas both to players and DM.

Great job, well worth its price.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Scarlet Heroes
by David E. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 05/11/2019 14:50:07

Despite how concise & short Scarlet Heroes is compared to other retroclones, I've been using it at almost every one of my gaming sessions for a few years now, & I've yet to exhaust using it; it's ended up becoming one of my most heavily used & favourite products from this store.

I wouldn't know where to start if I attempted a thorough review of it here, considering it has many possible uses, & it tends to excel in everything it does. But personally one of the biggest reasons I'd recommend it is it's become an indispensable tool in most of my solo & GM-less gaming. That is, besides many other features it has, it also includes many tables throughout it & mostly at the end of it, which essentially cover nearly everything randomly generative that I might need in any of my solo & GM-less gaming, all conveniently within this single book.

Among other things, that includes a very simple-to-use & flexible oracle, as well as many tables for NPC traits & behavior, urban/wilderness/dungeon encounter tables, adventure seeds, plot twists, & much more. So do many other good B/X-compatible books & resources for solo-gamers. Except Scarlet Heroes does it a notch better & more extensively. So it's become my main 'go-to' book for most of my solo & GM-less gaming.

Besides that (just hitting a few more key points here), instead of cloning B/X at-length as most retroclones do, it seems to just wisely shun that approach, in-order to more rigorously distill & tweak B/X's traditional rule mechanics & other content into something which is still BX-compatible, but is more tight & concise for optimal use in solo-gaming, GM-less gaming, & one-on-one gaming. Plus it distinguishes itself by using its own unique setting & bestiary, which makes it a relatively exotic & mystic-feeling, Far Eastern-flavored version of B/X. E.g. even just some of its fantastically Junji Ito-esque monsters alone would make it worth recommending here.

I could go on here, listing more things I love about Scarlet Heroes; but those are the main reasons it's become so heavily usedfor such a long time now at my gaming table. My only caveat recommending it here is that, if you're just looking for a standard retroclone which doubles as an all-in-one reference for classic B/X classes & monsters etc, you won't find that in Scarlet Heroes, because if anything it goes out of its way to avoid using the same classes, monsters, & treasure etc that most B/X-compatible retroclones attempt to do.

That said, its unique setting & bestiary in-lieu of that is also one of its strengths (as I already covered above). Plus it won't break compatiblity if you use it in combination with a more standard retroclone. In fact, in my experience, Scarlet Heroes works extremely well in-combination with other B/X-compatible games & supplements. For example, I often use it to expand & flesh-out some other B/X-compatible solo-gaming products which I love using too, such as Ruins of the Undercity & Mad Monks of Kwantoom. Plus I even use it with some relatively non-compatible solo-games quite a lot too, such as Four Against Darkness & Ironsworn.

Or simply put (as I already said from the start): Scarlet Heroes has many possible uses.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Scarlet Heroes
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

The Storms of Yizhao: An Adventure for Godbound
by Daniel C. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/29/2019 10:19:46

While Storms of Yizhao is well written and has some elements that can be salvaged and used for other adventures, the fact that the central plot revolves around serial rape without any forewarning or mention is disgusting and unacceptable. There is no mention of this in any description of the adventure and there is no content warning. There is no way to remove this element or gloss over it and run the adventure without it as it is literally the main plot. An adventure that is built around the concept of a city being punished because the victims of a serial rapist didn't come forward should have multiple content warnings and make it clear in the products description that rape plays a central, unavoidable role in the plot. One should not have to pay for this product before finding out that the plot revolves around serial rape.



Rating:
[1 of 5 Stars!]
The Storms of Yizhao: An Adventure for Godbound
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Godbound: A Game of Divine Heroes (Deluxe Edition)
by Christopher L. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/29/2019 04:10:39

This game is great fun. I'm running a Godbound campaign set in the current age, with the PCs as teenagers coming to terms with who they are in a normal, public highschool. The rules are flexible, adaptable, and the players are having a blast with it. The expansions that have been released have simply added to the game, and I'm looking forward to so much more for this line.

This is definitely an OSR game to add to your collection. The mechanics are suitable for pretty much any OSR game - and I'm certain it could easily be adapted to the 3rd edition of the popular RPG, and even the PF version as well. The mechanics are only slightly different from your typical OSR game, tailored to playing demigods - so you could easily let the demigods use these mechanics, while mortals use the normal OSR mechanics, and it would work out fine!



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Godbound: A Game of Divine Heroes (Deluxe Edition)
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

The Codex of the Black Sun: Sorcery for Stars Without Number
by Robert J W. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/27/2019 11:45:57

The Codex is more than just a translation of old D&D spellcasting tropes into a sci-fi context. Crawford's apparent design philosophy for spellcasters (that they should be doing the impossible, rather than just outshining the Warrior and the Expert when they spend spell slots) results in a library of new classes, spells, and foci that feel magical without falling into the "quadratic wizard" trap. The most potent spells have costs and limitations that demand more careful planning and risk management from spellcasters who want to get maximum value from their spell slots.

The sourcebook is flavorful too, providing new mysterious creatures called Shadows that can be enemies, summoned servants, or figures of worship that grant cultists twisted powers. Classes are accompanied by some default backstory and flavor to help players and GMs explain the otherworldly origins of their powers, and understand how magic-users might be judged by society. And for those GMs comfortable with a bigger bookkeeping burden, arcane research rules offer paths to power with built-in reasons to adventure for the research necessary to summon permenant minions, expand Arcanist spellbooks, and craft magical items.

If you don't want magic users in your sci-fi, obviously, pass on this one. If you do want them, buy the Codex without hesitation.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
The Codex of the Black Sun: Sorcery for Stars Without Number
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Stars Without Number: Revised Edition
by ANDREW P. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/23/2019 16:06:27

This is my favorite RPG! The GM tools and ease of use make it a breeze to learn and run, I love the sandbox creation tools and GM advice about things as simple as "don't create too much prep and burn yourself out, instead here is an effective minimum and above all have fun", and I am enthralled with everything about the game. My players are all coming either from D&D experience or no RPG experience and they had a fairly easy time getting acclimated (the D&D players did have to reconfigure some of their own expectations, both in the tone of the game and some mechanics like skill checks using 2d6 instead of a d20 but they caught on quick) and I have a feeling this will be my go to game for a long time now, maybe forever. Also, Kevin is honestly a blessing, not only do I love his work on this and his other games (I LOVE Scarlet Heroes) but he is active and willing to engage with his fans on the SWN subreddit and other places, just seems like a really great and open guy. Stars Without Number is a 10/10 for me.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Stars Without Number: Revised Edition
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Godbound: A Game of Divine Heroes (Free Edition)
by Shane G. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/14/2019 20:57:34

I've never played this game yet used the corebook extensively to create courts, factions, and gods for my worlds. A pleasure to read and an excellent addition to your library.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Godbound: A Game of Divine Heroes (Free Edition)
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Stars Without Number: Revised GM Screen
by Daniel A. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 03/12/2019 15:23:12

I was honestly hoping there would be more for a $5 purchase. Don't see a section in vehicles, don't see a section in NPC name generation, don't see a section on drones, don't see a section on cyberware, and don't see a section on lifestyles.



Rating:
[2 of 5 Stars!]
Stars Without Number: Revised GM Screen
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Sixteen Stars: Creating Places of Perilous Adventure
by Jim B. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 02/23/2019 11:51:18

This does a good job of presenting adventure situations for a science fiction RPG. Like the description says, it's system-neutral. On the sci-fi plausibility scale, it aims for the low-to-moderate range of plausibility. The settings mostly assume interstellar travel by humans to known and unknown planets populated by humans and/or aliens. Many of them are adaptable if you have a sword-and-planet game, such as turning "Derelict Orbital" into a wrecked vessel instead.

The sixteen site types are: Ancient Temples, Asteroid Bases, Barbarian Courts, Bureaucratic Agencies, Colonial Outposts, Derelict Orbitals, Disaster Areas, Doomed Habitats, Hellworld Settlements, Merciless Deserts, Planetary Starports, Prison Colonies, Savage Jungles, Tomb Cities, Vicious Slums, and War Zones.

They're not sixteen specific, mapped locations. There are no maps. There are no individual names of characters, stars, or worlds. There's no description of alien races or specific interstellar organizations. Instead, you get guidelines for creating your own sites and applying your setting's specifics.

Each site type is covered in two pages. The first page offers several paragraphs of guidance on setting up such a site: what purpose it might serve or why it's present, what state it might be in, and so on. The "Dressing the Set" section on the first page walks you through the creation of a conflict situation, using material from the second page.

The second page for each site type consists of tables for choosing or rolling up elements of a conflict situation. First, there's the d10 Adventure Seeds table. It offers five summaries of conflict situations for that site type. For example: "An Antagonist is taking advantage of a Complication in order to progress their plans to seize a Thing being kept at a Place. A local Friend is aware of their scheme, but is unable to intervene directly. Instead, they try to induce the PCs to steal the Thing first and get it offworld before the Antagonist can grab it."

The second page then includes five d8 tables for filling in the blanks in the adventure seed: Antagonists, Friends, Places, Complications, and Things. In the example above, the antagonist might be a hostile native alien leader and the place could be a storehouse of irreplaceable goods. There's a sixth d8 table that answers a question for the site you create, such as "What are they using it for?" or "Why won't they cooperate?" or "Why was this colony founded?"

Replay value should be good, because these aren't individual prefab sites. You could leverage Colonial Outposts to create multiple colonies, for example, or for additional adventures in a colony you used previously. Essentially, you're reskinning every time you use one of the site types. You're not bound by the tables, of course. As you flesh out your campaign, you could use your own Adventure Seeds, Antagonists, Friends, Places, Complications, or Things.

There are no mind-bending science fiction what-ifs or major campaign premises. It's more like you're planning next week's episode of an on-going TV series.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Sixteen Stars: Creating Places of Perilous Adventure
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Stars Without Number: Original Free Edition
by pirata n. [Verified Purchaser] Date Added: 02/15/2019 13:06:25

Really great scifi sandbox creator game. In this free book, you have the tools for creating your own universe, full of wreid and fun things. The sistem is caind of simple...but thats life. The perfect game, dosent exits.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Stars Without Number: Original Free Edition
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Stars Without Number: Revised Edition
by Roger L. [Featured Reviewer] Date Added: 01/15/2019 07:55:28

https://www.teilzeithelden.de/2018/12/11/ersteindruck-stars-without-number-sandkastenspiele-in-einer-weit-entfernten-galaxis/

Der Weltraum. Unendliche Weiten. Dieses Regelwerk soll dazu dienen Abenteuer auf fremden Planten zu erleben, unbekannte Lebensformen und neue Zivilisation zu entdecken. Das Buch dringt dabei in Regeltiefen vor, die kaum ein Regelwerk zuvor gesehen hat. Aber lohnt es sich auch? Dieser Frage wollen wir nachgehen.

Ursprünglich erschien die erste Edition von Stars without Number 2011 bei Sine Nomine Publishing und wurde schnell ein Geheimtipp in der Nische der Sci-Fi-Rollenspiele. Sechs Jahre und einige Erweiterungen später wurde in einem enorm erfolgreichen Kickstarter die Revised Edition finanziert und verlegt. Ähnlich den anderen Publikationen des Verlags, beispielsweise Godbound oder Silent Legions, legt Autor Kevin Crawford einen Fokus darauf Sandboxkampagnen nicht nur zu ermöglichen, sondern die Spielleitung explizit in der Erstellung und Durchführung einer solchen Kampagne zu unterstützen. Mit welchem Tipps und Hilfsmitteln das ermöglicht werden soll, schauen wir uns in der Folge an.

Die Spielwelt Der Hintergrund Obwohl Stars without Number sich zum Ziel gesetzt hat eine möglichst breite Art von Hintergründen und Spielstilen zu unterstützen, liefert es trotzdem ein eigenes Setting mit, dass von der Spielleitung als Ausgangspunkt genutzt werden kann. In dieser Welt führte vor hunderten von Jahren ein Kataklysmus namens „Der Schrei“ zum Zusammenbruch des terranischen Mandats. In einem Moment verloren alle Telepathen aus unbekannten Gründen ihren Verstand und die entstehende metadimensionale Welle ließ den intergalaktischen Transport als auch die Kommunikation zusammenbrechen. In der folgenden Zeit, das Schweigen genannt, zerfiel nicht nur die Macht des Mandats, sondern  auch ganze Zivilisationen stürzten zusammen. Der Umgang mit komplexen Technologien und das Aufrechterhalten der Gesellschaften  fielen in basalere Stadien zurück.

Nun, Jahrhunderte später, hat die Menschheit erneut begonnen sich zwischen den Sternensystemen zu bewegen. Nur einige wenige Welten haben die technischen Errungenschaften der Zeit vor dem Schrei, der so genannten Prä-Technologie, bewahren können. Die meisten Welten arbeiten mit Neuentwicklungen, der Post-Technologie, die aber unzuverlässiger, weniger effektiv oder weniger mächtig sind als ihre antiken Vorgänger. Einige Welten schicken sich an ihre Nachbarn durch Diplomatie oder militärische Macht unter ihren Einfluss zu zwingen, andere haben nicht die notwendige Kenntnis oder Ressourcen sich aus einer zweiten Steinzeit zu befreien. Der Sektor steht also an einer historischen Wasserscheide. Welche Fraktion wird aufsteigen, welche fallen, wer erhebt sich aus dem Staub der Geschichte und wer wird endgültig vergessen?

Die Spieler im Sandkasten

Artwork von Stars Without Number Man kann es dem vorangegangenen Absatz schon entnehmen. Die SpielerInnen starten – zumindest wenn das Ausgangssetting benutzt wird – in eine Welt voller Möglichkeiten. Die Welt ist noch nicht an einem Punkt angekommen, dass sich eine Fraktion gegen die andere durchgesetzt hätte und die Machtverhältnisse sind im Fluss. Es bedarf also herausragenden Individuen, die bereit sind, das Schicksal der Menschheit zu beeinflussen und zu den Helden oder Schurken ihrer Zeit zu werden. Oder um es mit den Worten des Berliner Historikers Leopold von Ranke zu sagen „In großen Entscheidungen ist es notwendig, dass mächtige Männer eine Unternehmung zu ihrer persönlichen Angelegenheit machen.“ Heute würde man das sicherlich inklusiver und mit weniger heiligem Ernst formulieren, als es Ranke Ende des 19. Jahrhunderts tat, aber der Aussage wohnt der gleiche Geist inne, der auch die Idee der Sandbox belebt: Eine große Entscheidung zu einer persönlichen Sache machen.

Aus diesem Grund kommt das Setting auch nahezu ohne vorgegebene Fraktionen, Konflikte, Storylines etc. aus. Es ist vielmehr wie ein großer Baukasten zu verstehen, aus dem man etwas Eigenes zusammenstellen kann. Das ist natürlich mehr Arbeit als ein vorgefertigtes Abenteuer in einem existierenden Setting zu nehmen und die SpielerInnen durch eine Plot-Achterbahn zu jagen, aber wenn es funktioniert, kann es eine sehr belohnende Erfahrung sein. Damit die Erstellung des Hintergrunds aber nicht in zu viel Arbeit ausartet, nimmt Stars without Numbers die potenzielle Spielleitung von Anfang an an die Hand. In den folgenden Absätzen betrachten wir deshalb die grundlegenden Design-Prinzipien des Spiels und beleuchten, wie das Spiel die Spielleitung Schritt für Schritt hindurchleitet.  

Die Regeln Bedingt durch die enorm erfolgreiche Kickstarter-Kampagne, die immer neue Kapitel als Stretchgoal freigeschaltet hat, ist das Buch sehr umfangreich geworden. Es gibt Regeln für naheliegende Dinge in einem Science-Fiction-Rollenspiel wie beispielsweise Raumkampf oder Sektorenerschaffung. Dann gibt es Regeln für Dinge, die für bestimmte Szenarien sinnvoll sein können, wie psionische Kräfte oder künstliche Intelligenzen. Und schließlich gibt es auch noch Regeln für Weltraum-Magie oder intelligente Nanitenschwärme als Hülle für die selbstbewusste Essenz antiker AIs. Damit die Rezension nicht in Detailanalyse ausartet, beschränkt sich die genauere Betrachtung hier auf die Regeln zur Setting- und Charaktererschaffung.

Settingerstellung

Artwork von Stars Without Number Dieser Teil des Regelwerks ist eines der Kernstücke und auch der, an dem man die Designphilosophie des Spiels am besten sieht. Legt man zu Grunde, dass Stars without Number vor allem eine Hilfestellung zum Spielen in einer Science-Fiction-Sandbox sein will, dann ist die Sektorenerstellung das Herz des Spiels. Hier wird die Spielleitung Schritt für Schritt durch einen Prozess geleitet, an dessen Ende eine Hexkarte eines Sternensystems mitsamt verschiedenen Planetensystemen unterschiedlicher Entwicklungsstufen, Raumschiffhäfen, aktiven und inaktiven Raumstationen, Asteroidenminen, Fraktionen und Handelswegen steht. Im Prinzip also alle beweglichen Teile, die man in einem solchen Setting erwarten oder brauchen kann.

Doch ehe das alles steht, ist es ein langer Weg und am Anfang steht ein großes übergreifendes Werkzeug, das so alt ist wie das Hobby selbst: Die Zufallstabelle. Es gibt für beinahe alles in diesem Generierungsschritt Zufallstabellen. Dabei ist es nicht zwingend notwendig sie immer und für alles zu benutzen, aber sie helfen bei der Erstellung eines eigenen Systems ungemein, wenn man nicht von vornherein mit einem sehr detaillierten und festen Bild an die Sache herangeht. Wem generell die Idee eines zufällig generierten Systems nicht gefällt, der wird sicherlich mit diesem Spiel nicht glücklich werden. Wer bereit ist dieser Herangehensweise grundsätzlich eine Chance zu geben, der bekommt hier ein Paradebeispiel geliefert, bei dem sich viele andere Spiele unter dem Banner der Sandboxspiele eine gehörige Scheibe abschneiden können. Es würde zu weit gehen jede einzelne der Tabellen zu besprechen, aber vielleicht kann ein einfaches Beispiel verdeutlichen, wie die Sektorenerschaffung funktioniert.

Nachdem man die Anzahl der Planeten festgelegt und ihre Position auf einem Hexfeld beliebiger Größe angeordnet hat, geht es darum den Planeten so genannte tags zuzuordnen. Tags sind hier zu verstehen als kurze Schlagworte, die die leitenden Charakteristika des Planeten umschreiben. Um einen Planeten mit tags auszustatten, wirft man zweimal einen 1W100 und schaut unter den entsprechenden Einträgen nach. So hat man dann beispielsweise einen Gefängnisplaneten, dessen Terraforming nie beendet wurde. Oder aber eine paradiesische Gartenwelt, die eine Zivilisation beherbergt, die dabei ist zum Hegemon des Systems aufzusteigen. Damit allein ist es aber noch nicht getan. Jeder tag hat eine ausführlichere Beschreibung komplett mit möglichen Feinden, Verbündeten, Komplikationen, Orten und Dingen, die es zu entdecken gibt. Dabei sind die Beschreibungen zwar kurz, aber immer atmosphärisch und evokativ, so dass es leicht fällt direkt die Grundlinien eines Spielabends zu erkennen, während man auf die tags schaut.

Nachdem man also nun tags ausgewählt oder erwürfelt hat, bestimmt man auf gleiche Wirf-auf-Tabelle-Weise weitere Kennzahlen des Planeten (Bevölkerung, Atmosphäre, technische Entwicklung) und zusätzliche interessante Dinge des Systems wie Raumstationen oder orbitale Ruinen. Für die Statistiker noch interessant: Bei den letzten Tabellen wird mit 2W6 statt einem W100 gewürfelt, so dass die spielerisch sinnvolleren Optionen, wie atembare Luft und zumindest rudimentäre Bevölkerung, stochastisch bevorzugt werden. Danach können noch Fraktionen erstellt werden, die im Metahintergrund agieren und die Welt so zum Leben erwecken. Natürlich können SpielerInnen mit der Zeit einer dieser Fraktionen beitreten, sie übernehmen oder zu eigenen Fraktionen aufsteigen. Für all dieses bietet das Buch Regeln und lässt so einen ambitionierten Leiter nicht im sprichwörtlichen Regen stehen. All das kann aber auch später kommen, denn die ersten Abenteuer brauchen nicht zwingend eine Myriade agierenden Hintergrundfraktionen, sondern diese können nach und nach eingeführt werden. Wichtiger ist es, dass man die erstellte Welt zum Spielen nutzt. Darum wenden wir uns nun den möglichen Abenteuern zu.  

Abenteuererstellung und Spielphilosophie

Artwork von Stars Without Number Nachdem der Sektor in seinen Grundgerüsten steht, bleibt natürlich noch die Frage offen, wie viele Details man hinzufügen will und was genau man denn in diesem Spielkasten tun will. Hier zeigt sich, dass Stars without Number trotz seiner Detailfülle diesen Aspekt nicht aus den Augen gelassen hat. Die grundlegende Philosophie zu diesen beiden Fragen wird bereits zu Beginn der Sektorenerschaffung explizit aufgeschrieben und lässt sich auf zwei grundlegende Fragen zuspitzen: „Habe ich Spaß?“ und „Brauche ich das für die nächste Sitzung?“ Im Idealfall sollten beide Fragen mit „Ja“ beantwortet werden. Sollte die Antwort bedingt durch die Detailuntiefen „Nein“ lauten, sollte man aufhören. Im Zweifel rät das Spiel einem dazu, die fehlenden Details von den SpielerInnen ausgestalten zu lassen, um ihre Verbindung mit der Welt einerseits und ihr Engagement am Spieltisch andererseits zu stärken. Beides enorm wichtige Dinge, wenn eine Sandboxkampagne gut laufen soll. Der Fokus auf den Spieltisch und die konkreten Bedürfnisse des Spielabends werden jederzeit höchste Priorität gewidmet, was auch gar nicht oft genug erwähnt werden kann. Denn ansonsten findet sich die Spielleitung schnell mit einer bis ins Detail ausgearbeiteten transhumanistischen Zivilisation körperloser, unsterblicher Intellekte wieder, die ihre Grenzen mit einer quantenkommunikativ gesteuerten Armada semibewusster AI-Kriegsschiffe verteidigen, was die SpielerInnen beschließen mit Ignoranz zu lösen. Statt sich also wie Captain Kirk mit Bauernschläue und Todesverachtung einer überlegenen Zivilisation von Energiemonstern zu stellen, drehen sie ihre Nostromo um und verschwinden so schnell sie können, um sich und ihre mühsam zusammengeklaubten Besitztümer in Sicherheit zu bringen. Will man als Spielleitung nun die Entscheidung der Charaktere nicht entwerten, indem man sie per Traktorstrahl in den Konflikt hineinzwingt, muss man die ganze Arbeit zur Seite schieben und aus dem Handgelenk eine neue Geschichte improvisieren.

Damit das möglichst leicht machbar ist, gibt einem das Kapitel zur Abenteuererstellung einige gute Hilfsmittel an die Hand, damit der Frust über die schnöde ignorierten Mary-Sue-Übermenschen nicht zum Abbruch der gesamten Kampagne führt.

Kurzum folgt man auch hier wieder dem Prinzip der Spielleitung einen Baukasten für eigene Abenteuer zu liefern. Die Spielleitung wird angehalten sich über die Motivation seiner Gruppe klar zu werden, um so das bestmögliche Abenteuer für diese spezifische Gruppe zu erstellen. Dabei geht die Abenteueranleitung nach bekannten Mustern vor, die aber in einer sehr verständlichen und klaren Sprache formuliert sind. Such dir die Themen des Abenteuers aus, schreib eine grobe Outline an Szenen, füge beliebige Anzahl an Details und Handouts hinzu, mach dir klar welche Motivation deine Gruppe haben könnte deinem Storyköder zu folgen, dann noch einmal aufpolieren und auf die Spielerschaft loslassen. Damit die eigenen kreativen Prozesse starten können, kommt erneut die Zufallstabelle zum Einsatz. Den Abschluss bildet eine Übersicht von 100 möglichen Abenteuerideen, wenn man denn so gar nicht weiß, wo man anfangen soll.

Charaktererschaffung

Artwork von Stars Without Number Die Sektoren stehen, mögliche Abenteueraufhänger sind auch etabliert und man hat sich gemeinsam mit der Gruppe überlegt, was man denn spielen will. Nun müssen natürlich noch Charaktere her. Stars without Number steht hier sicher in der OSR-Tradition des Rollenspiels. Das bedeutet, dass unter der Motorhaube grundlegend eine einfache D&D-Version arbeitet mit all den typischen Eigenheiten dieser Spiele. Es gibt sechs grundlegende Attribute, denen entsprechende Fähigkeiten zugeordnet sind. Je höher der Attributswert, desto höher der Bonus, den man auf einen Wurf bekommt. Man bekommt entweder eine feste Anzahl an Punkten, die man auf Attribute und Fertigkeiten verteilen kann oder man kann sie zufällig erwürfeln. Von diesen Werten leiten sich Werte wie Rüstungsklasse oder Rettungswürfe ab.

Alle Charaktere basieren dann auf einer Kombination von Hintergrund, Klasse und Fokus. Der Hintergrund steht dabei für die biografische oder soziale Herkunft wie zum Beispiel Adel, Klerus, Fabrikarbeiter etc. Die Klasse legt fest, was der Charakter hauptsächlich macht und worauf er sich im Spiel konzentrieren will. Der Krieger kämpft, der Experte hat ein besonderes Spezialgebiet, der Psioniker hat übersinnliche Kräfte und der Abenteurer konnte sich nicht so recht entscheiden und möchte sich alle Optionen offenhalten. Schließlich nimmt man noch Foki, die den bisher relativ generischen Charakteren spezifische Ausformungen geben. Der Krieger kann also entweder Soldat, Offizier, Assassine oder Ritter einer technologisch wenig entwickelten Welt sein.

Man muss dazu sagen, dass Stars without Number – wie alle OSR-Spiele – deutlich in der tödlichen Ecke angesiedelt ist. Ein einzelner Blasterschuss kann auch erfahrene Charaktere auf der Stelle töten. Wem das nicht gefällt, der kann natürlich die Alternativregeln für heroische Charaktere benutzen, die mit höheren Lebenspunkten, Rettungswürfen etc. einhergehen.

Ansonsten ist zu der Charaktererschaffung wenig zu sagen. Das System ist simpel und leicht verständlich, bietet aber auch Möglichkeiten zu Optimierung und Numbercrunching. Es wirkt intuitiv, wenn auch wenig innovativ. 

Erscheinungsbild Das Buch erscheint – wie bei DriveThruRPG üblich – in mehreren Druckoptionen. Alle Aussagen basieren auf der farbigen Premiumversion, wie sie im Rahmen des Kickstarters ausgeliefert wurde. Optisch ist das Buch solide gemacht. Das durchgängig zweispaltige Schriftbild ist angenehm zu lesen und dezente farbige Balken am Rand lassen einen beim Durchblättern nicht nur immer wissen, wann ein neues Kapitel beginnt, sondern bilden eine schöne optische Kapitelklammer. Ferner wird jedes Kapitel durch eine großes einseitiges Artwork eingeleitet und zwischendurch sind immer wieder künstlerische Auflockerungen eingestreut. Das erfüllt alles seinen Zweck, entfacht aber auch keinen Begeisterungssturm. Die Artworks sind durchgehend von solider Qualität ohne allerdings dabei besonders hervorzustechen. Das Papier ist matt und angenehm dick, so dass es auch haptisch nichts zu bemängeln gibt. Der einzige kleine Wermutstropfen ist, dass der Buchblock deutlich kleiner ist als das ihn umgebene Hardcover. Da der Pappeinband somit an drei Seiten deutlich „übersteht“ bekommt er deutlich schneller Knicke und die Ecken sehen schnell bestoßen aus. Insgesamt aber ein handwerklich gutes Produkt, dessen Fokus aber klar auf der guten Benutzbarkeit und nicht schönem Aussehen liegt. 

Bonus/Downloadcontent Zum Zeitpunkt dieses Ersteindrucks gibt es keinen offiziellen Bonuscontent. Allerdings hat man auf der Webseite des Projekts Sectors without Number die Möglichkeit eine Web-Version der Sektorenerschaffung zu nutzen. Außerdem wird auf DriveThruRPG eine kostenlose Variante des Spiels vertrieben, die einige Sonderregelkapitel und Artworks weniger enthält, aber einen hervorragenden Startpunkt abgibt.

Fazit Die Ein-Mann-Schreibarmee Kevin Crawford hat mit der Revised Edition von Stars without Number ein beeindruckendes Werk vorgelegt. Auf den etwas mehr als 300 Seiten findet sich ein wahres Füllhorn an Ideen, Anleitungen und Regeln für nahezu jeden Aspekt von Science-Fiction-Rollenspielen im Generellen und den Sandbox-Spielstil im Speziellen. Wer schon immer einmal sein eigenes Universum erschaffen und dann seine SpielerInnen darauf loslassen wollte, der hat mit diesem Buch quasi eine Pflichtlektüre vor sich.

Optisch ist das Ganze sicher keine Schönheit, aber der Text an sich ist so dicht, dass manches Regelsystem mit dem dreifachen Seitenumfang nicht an die inhaltliche Tiefe herankommt. Alle Regel-Subsysteme wie Fraktionenhandlungen oder Raumkampf sind intuitiv und folgen dem klaren Designanspruch möglichst schnell und flüssig am Spieltisch umsetzbar zu sein und wenn möglich alle SpielerInnen einbinden zu können. Eine vorbildliche Herangehensweise, an der sich andere Simulationen ein Beispiel nehmen können.

Natürlich muss man dazu sagen, dass die schiere Fülle an Optionen einen mitunter fast erschlägt und eventuell einschüchternd wirken kann, aber die Beschäftigung lohnt sich für jeden, der Spaß an Science-Fiction Kampagnen hat. Mit knapp zwanzig US-Dollar für die PDF und 60 US-Dollar für die günstigste Druckversion gehört Stars without Number sicherlich nicht zu den günstigen Vertretern seiner Art, aber die kostenlose Variante bietet einem die Möglichkeit legal und gefahrlos in die Kernelemente des Spiels reinzuschnuppern, ehe man die Investition tätigt. Auch das verdient, wie das gesamte Buch, viel Lob und Anerkennung. Insgesamt ein uneingeschränkt empfehlenswertes Produkt. Chapeau, Herr Crawford.

Der Ersteindruck basiert auf der Lektüre des Buches und der Erschaffung eines kompletten Sektors mit Hilfe der entsprechenden Regeln.



Rating:
[5 of 5 Stars!]
Stars Without Number: Revised Edition
Click to show product description

Add to DriveThruRPG.com Order

Displaying 46 to 60 (of 323 reviews) Result Pages: [<< Prev]   1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 ...  [Next >>] 
0 items
 Hottest Titles
 Gift Certificates